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E215: How to Secure Your Home Like a Professional Safe House

Safe House

In this episode, James Price shares with us his trade secrets for securing your home like a safe house for protecting high-value people. These safe houses are often in unstable areas of the world and must protect the occupants from many typse of threats.

For new listeners, James is a veteran executive protection consultant with over a decade of experience as a high-priced civilian security contractor in the Middle East and Far East Asia. James gives his expert opinion on the mistakes you are probably making with regard to home safety; some key elements you need to consider to evaluate the safety of your house; the security systems he recommends; and what you can do to protect your home when you are away.

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Before we bring James on, I need to give y’all a little back story on this episode because it’s going to sound a little weird. This episode was recording for another podcast I did for a company. And when I got done I thought, “Damn, that was a good episode. I wish it was on ITRH.” Well… the company ended going through some restructuring and went a different direction with their marketing. A few months later they even took the show out of iTunes because it was still generating a lot of calls.
 
In total, there were sixteen episodes. And these episodes were tucked away and only available to the ITRH Armada in their private members’ area since that company took them down from iTunes.
 
But it’s always bugged me this episode wasn’t on ITRH. So… as part of our wind down to the summer break, I wanted to share it with you.

Securing your Home and Making it a Safe House Topics:

  • Who is James and what does he do
  • How did James get into executive protection
  • What would you say is the number one thing people do to open themselves up to being a target at home
  • When evaluating a structure for security issues, what are the primary things you look for
  • How often should a regular person do some kind of perimeter check on their home
  • When you’re setting up security systems for a safe house, what are your must-have pieces? (e.g. video, motion)
  • What realistic limitations should people be aware of with security systems that aren’t backed by an on-site security team
  • When away from home, what do people do that make their home target
  • What non-lethal tools do you find effective in personal defense
  • The one mistake you are probably making that is increasing your chances of becoming the victim of a home invasion.
  • Some of the things James looks at when he is evaluating a home’s safety
  • Why you should have contrasting shutters for your home
  • What you can do to improve the security of your doors and windows
  • An important, but often over-looked element of personal security
  • The first thing James does to improve the security of a safe house
  • Two important times when you should do a perimeter check
  • James’ must-have pieces for an ideal security system
  • Where you should place motion sensors
  • Why the placement of your security cameras is probably wrong and where you should put them instead
  • Why a security system is like a fire alarm
  • What you can do to secure your home while you’re away
  • Some tips for staying safe in hotel rooms
  • A few non-lethal defensive measures you can put in place
  • How satin bedsheets and fog machines can increase the safety of your home
  • What you should use instead of pepper spray for home safety, and how
  • James’ top tips for keeping your home safe and secure

Episode Resources:

By | 2017-05-10T13:01:12+00:00 April 24th, 2017|Urban Survival Podcast Episodes|0 Comments

About the Author:

In his free time, Aaron enjoys hogging the remote, surfing, scotch, mental masturbation and debate over philosophical topics, and shooting stuff--usually not all at the same time.

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