7 Survival Car Bag Items

by Aaron Frankel on November 23, 2012

in Friday Survival Gear Reports

Often the most over looked survival bag is the one that lives in your vehicle. That’s mainly because we put so much time and energy into a BOB that tends to live at home.

But (assuming you survived Thanks Giving) it’s that time of year when a lot of people are traveling by car. And it’s that time of year when we tend to be hauling our most precious cargo: family.

So here’s seven items to get you over the hill and through the woods. Then back home safe again.

…And these are also great stocking stuffers/gifts for the survivalist on your list.

#1: Canteen

Water takes is place in the top three survival needs. And when traveling it’s no less important. But some people have concerns about leaving water in a vehicle in a plastic container. Enter the 64oz Klean Canteen.

#2: Emergency Rations

Food also tops the list of survival needs. Yet it also has it’s own set of problems when it comes to storing in a vehicle. For that we turn to products specifically designed for such conditions: Datrex  Emergency Food Bars.

They won’t be great for your Palio Diet. But they will last for an extended period in the ever changing conditions a vehicle presents.

#3: Emergency Sleeping Bag

Cars and trucks these days have really great climate control systems. But if our vehicle is inoperable chances are good so is the heater. So rather than being uncomfortalbe or worse–suffering from hyperthermia–add something to keep your warm.

I’m not trading in my highend down sleeping bag anytime soon when camping. But the SOL Emergency Bivvy is perfect for a car emergency bag. It’s lightweight, compact, and I’ve yet to read/watch any reviews that find issue with the SOL bag.

Leatherman New Wave#4: Multitool

Over the years I’ve tried out many mutitools. But the Leatherman Wave still comes in first place. It’s just the right amount and types of tools and it’s comfortable in the hand.

#5: The Road Side Kit

I know, I’m kind of cheating with this one. But a roadside kit that includes such things as signals, jumper cables, gloves, and a flashlight really is a must. And while piecing together a best of the best kit is the way to go for motor heads, the rest of us can go with the AAA 73 Piece Excursion Road Kit.

#6: Light

Seems things always go wrong in the dark. And holding a flashlight takes up one of your two hands when you always seem to need both. So rather than chipping a tooth on and drooling all over your tactical flashlight, get a headlamp.

I’ve long been a proponent of headlamps over flashlights. And the Energizer 7 LED Headlight is a good price meets quality mark.

#7: Backup Phone Charger

The best way to get out of a bad situation is often to call for help. But that’s hard to do if you’ve let your cell phone die. And if the issue leaving you stranded is the car battery, you’re SOL (aka Shit Out of Luck).

Recently on a trip I opted to leave my Joos Orange at home. And I then, on my return flight, promptly forgot my charger at the place I was visiting. Thankfully the clever folks at Best Buy have installed electronics vending machines in air ports. This is where I was introduced to the Mophie Powerstation (It’s also about $10 cheaper through Best Buy–the link–than Amazon).

It’s not cheap. But it does exactly what it says it will, charges quickly, is lightweight, and compact. So I’ve been very happy with mine that now lives in my EDC bag.

Stay safe…

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Darcey Kobs November 25, 2012 at 2:17 pm

I think Paleo is spelled like this.

Reply

2 Aaron Frankel November 25, 2012 at 2:23 pm

Ha! You’re right. Thanks, Darcey.

Reply

3 John Rosalia November 26, 2012 at 10:38 am

Aaron,

One other thing that should be mentioned is the actual placement of certain gear and equipment in your vehicle. I live on Long Island, NY and after dealing with Hurricane Sandy, we got hit with a Nor’easter which gave us our first messy snow storm. Although, I had everything I needed in a large tote box in the back of my Hyundai Santa fe, I found it difficult to dig through everything to get to my gloves, hat and ice scrapscaper from the rear hatchback as the snow and wind was blowing in my face.. I have since re-organized my car. I keep my first aid kit under the front passenger seat, my hat and gloves in my driver door compartment and the ice scraper under my driver seat.. It makes it that much easier so that I can get in my car, close the door, put on my hat and gloves, grab the scraper and go back out and clean my car off.
Also, I have purchased a second ice scraper, hat, and gloves which I keep in the file cabinet drawer in my cubicle at work along with other gear such as first aid kit, food, clothes, etc.

Reply

4 Aaron Frankel November 26, 2012 at 10:51 am

John,

Thanks for the great tips!

Reply

Join the discussion!

Previous post:

Next post: